Archive for the ‘Events’ Category


Young people and volunteer research

Young people and volunteer research

WTA Chair Dr Ronda Green presented this 4-minute talk in the “Inspiring the Next Generation” theme at the recent World Parks Congress n Sydney:

birdwatchgirlIt’s great when young people get ‘switched-on’ to nature, but they can then become frustrated and discouraged by not knowing others who share their enthusiasm, a lack of opportunity to actually do something for conservation of the animals and forests or reefs they have come to love, and a lack of confidence in their ability to do something useful if such opportunity does arise.

The Australian Wildlife Research Network was founded by Wildlife Tourism Australia, originally for communication between tour operators conducting or assisting with research but not knowing of each others’ existence, but has been expanded to include networking between tour operations and academics for mutual benefit, and between tour operators and volunteer tourists, including young adults, teenagers and families with children.

The network website also includes information on identification guides, field equipment, monitoring methods, literature on working with volunteers and other guidelines for academics, tour operators and the volunteers themselves.

Young folk can be inspired and encouraged by opportunities to experience wild places and wildlife, socialising with other enthusiasts and interacting with researchers, and knowing they are contributing to useful research or monitoring for conservation management or to the general understanding of our wildlife ecology and behaviour.

The network, which includes tours, ecolodges and wildlife parks involved in research, is the only one we know of that focuses on wildlife research and monitoring connected with tourism throughout Australia and including projects for all budget levels and ages to join in with.

A successful project involving volunteers has to be well-planned, including clear explanation to participants on what to expect, friendly greeting, effective training on what needs to be done, appropriate assignment of tasks, from carrying or cleaning equipment through helping to find animals to actually taking measurements or recording observations, opportunity for participants to socialise, and where possible to safely experience being alone in nature, and to learn about the animals and ecosystems they are experiencing, and also whether the data is to be collected in a way consistent with valid analysis or comparison (for instance between seasons, or the progression of a restoration plot) and for valid conclusions to be made, and how the information collected will ultimately be used. Feedback from participants and stakeholders is also important

It’s not enough to ignite a fire, we have to keep the flame alive amongst our youth, and the Australian Wildlife Research Network is one vehicle to assist with this.

To find out more, please visit wildliferesearchnetwork.org.au


WTA at Australia’s first national Bird Fair

WTA at Australia’s first national Bird Fair

Australia’s first national Bird Fair has just been held over the weekend of 25-26 October

More accurately, it is the Australasian Bird Fair (that is, including not just Australia but also New Guinea and New Zealand)

BirdFairDisplay2014

Wildlife Tourism Australia held a display on wildlife tourism, birds and minimal-impact wildlife-viewing, and promoted many of our members’ products

It was also a great event for networking with folk from around Australia (including Christmas Island) and the rest of the world (including PNG, New Zealand, India, Guyana, Colombia and Africa). Displays included birding tours, conservation and natural history groups (not just birds – bats, reptiles and frogs were there as well), retailers of binoculars and spotting scopes, and some delightful arts and crafts. Events included many talks, films, bird walks and children’s activities.

It was good also to catch up with some WTA members who attended, from Cassowary House, Sicklebill Safaris, O’Reilly’s and Boutique Tours

We found many visitors to our display were surprised and pleased at WTA’s commitment to environmentally-responsible tourism, supporting the protection of wildlife habitat and minima-impact wildlife-viewing.

We hope this Bird Fair is just the beginning of a line of valuable annual events


Savannah Guides School

Savannah GuidesSavannah Guides have scheduled a new workshop

“Guiding Skills In The Kimberley”

Date:  9th to 12th October

This is a four day workshop which will showcase the dramatic landscape of the region as well as it’s history and enormous tourism future.

Savannah Guides Limited develops the skills and careers of tour guides.  It is a non-profit, member based network of tourguides and operators that works with its partners to support “Protectors and Interpreters of the Outback”.

This El Questro Savannah Guides School will provide valuable skills training and networking for guides and friends from across northern Australia.  Most of the time will be spent in the field exploring spectacular landscapes and learning about the incredible Kimberley region.

***Download the pdf for more infoInfo-El-Questro


EXPLORING BIODIVERSITY AS CULTURAL VALUE

 

EXPLORING BIODIVERSITY AS CULTURAL VALUE

An interesting seminar to be hosted by the University of Sydney next month

16 June, 2014
12:00-2:00pm

ALL WELCOME
This is a Free Event.
RSVP Essential

Seminar Featuring John Miller and Robert McKay 

http://sydney.edu.au/arts/research/harn/news_events/events.shtml?id=2785

From their website:

To whom does extinction matter, why, and how? Answers to these questions often rely on a principle of concealed usefulness. In this outlook, biodiversity represents a vast data bank of genetic information that contains an array of undiscovered possibilities for medicine or industry. A striking contrast to this hard-nosed, market-driven approach resides in the emotional attachment to certain species, or to the natural world more generally, that motivates many conservation campaigns. Such reasoning, though widely on show, has the disadvantage of appearing vague, sentimental and under-theorized. What it highlights is the urgent need for a humanities perspective on the question of biodiversity loss as a key part of the global challenge of responding to climate change.


Book Review. Nature-based Tourism and Conservation

Book Review. Nature-based Tourism and Conservation (Tisdell and Wilson)

book covrTisdell, C. and Wilson, C. 2012. Nature-based Tourism and Conservation: New Economic Insights and Case Studies, Edward Elgar, Cheltenham

Review by Ronda Green, Chair of Wildlife Tourism Australia

Ecotourism is often cited as a saviour of wildlife and their habitats, a view that is regarded with skepticism by others. In general the ideas are commendable but we often lack the necessary knowledge of local situations to effectively enhance conservation efforts as well as offering great experiences to tourists and financial gain to operators and the local community.

This volume, based on research since the turn of this century, offers valuable insights and information on the connection between nature tourism and biodiversity conservation from an economic perspective.It is an important bridging aid that should be read by all who are interested in this topic. Those more familiar with the economics of the tourism industry will gain many insights into the complexities of biodiversity conservation, and those more well-versed in conservation biology will be introduced to many aspects of the role of economics in achieving conservation aims through tourism.

Useful economics tools are described, but their limitations for particular situations are also discussed. Assumptions such as consumers always being fully informed and making rational choices for instance are not always valid. Models used for one purpose may need modifications to be used for others. Difficulties of finding answers to what would seem like simple questions are also discussed – e.g. visitation rates to World Heritage listed sites, when some of these sites cover vast areas and have multiple entry points.

The authors point out that many tourists travel to experience natural wonders and to enjoy nature in various other ways, and that such experiences can form an important part of their travel even when not the primary purpose. They ask whether the growth of nature tourism has a positive or negative effect on nature conservation, and caution from the start that there is no simple answer, a theme that is revisited multiple times throughout the work. One case discussed at some length is that of hatchery-raised sea-turtles as a combined tourism-conservation project, demonstrating that it can certainly create an economic return, but although there is potential for positive conservation outcomes, the actual conservation impact (positive or negative) depends very much on how the industry is managed in any particular region, and that there are relevant factors we don’t as yet know in sufficient detail (e.g. survival rate of young turtles hatched in the wild as opposed to those raised in hatcheries, including those kept for lengthy periods before release). A survey of the tourist activity based on turtles coming ashore to lay eggs at Mon Repos in Queensland resulted in a more favourable report for conservation, both in terms of education of visitors and of lack of adverse effects (the authors note that the turtles indeed seem to be increasing there).

An interesting point raised in the first chapter is that Birdlilfe International encourages its members to travel to demonstrate the value of bird and habit conservation. This may at first reading sound a little manipulative, but I see it more as a way of nature-lovers showing the concern they already  feel, and their support for local conservation projects, while being rewarded by an enjoyable holiday or day-trip. Bird watchers and other nature enthusiasts don’t always make it obvious that they are visiting a region (and thus spending on local products and services)  for this pleasure, and so tourism providers, travel agents and local councils may well be unaware of their reasons for being there: maybe  nature-loving tourists could develop a habit of chatting more with hotel staff, service station attendants, waiters and others!

Some of the topics are very relevant to changes happening in Australia’s legislation in the current decade, with several governments wanting to ‘open up’ national parks to increasingly more kinds of tourism activities and facilities, and to downplay the role of biodiversity conservation as opposed to recreation. A survey showed that visitors to a reserve in Far North Queensland were largely opposed  to the development of commercial services and facilities in national parks, although they mostly favoured guided tours within national parks. World Heritage values are hailed in the book as important for national pride in natural areas, and enhancing protection by the federal government. Recent proposed changes to our legislation may see a watering down of the ability of federal government to intervene in matters related to World Heritage, and to the de-listing of some sites.

Conservation costs money, and the concept of national parks making money to be used for conservation management is essentially sound, but the details of how to do so are problematic. Increasing the tourism dollar may not have to depend on introducing more 4WD, horse-riding and accommodation into our national parks. The book points to  a number of opportunities as yet under-utilised, such as more provision for the under-supplied and growing demand for opportunities for sea-bird viewing, and possibilities for insect-based tourism such as butterfly- or fire-fly watching. The authors also present findings on surveys on willingness of visitors to pay for entry into national parks: opposition to the idea includes a feeling that ‘nature should be free’,  that charging for national park entry makes it a more elitist  activity, and that proceeds from those that do charge entry fees go into general government revenue rather than specifically towards conservation management.

Contributions to local economies is an essential component of ecotourism, and also provides incentives to local government to protect natural areas. Research discussed in the book shows where this is well established and places where it is not (for instance the lack of local restaurants and souvenir shops near natural attractions such as glow worm sites).

There are many examples where tourism is contributing to conservation either directly or indirectly, or has a real potential for doing so. There are other cases such as tree-kangaroo viewing in Far North Queensland where group sizes need to be small and the activity is labour-intensive for the guide and to some extent for the tourists themselves, where the tourism dollar is thus currently insufficient to pay for conservation, and government assistance is necessary. The very title of the tree-kangaroo chapter suggests that more revenue could perhaps be raised if the species became more famous amongst tourists. Doubtless there are many other species that could achieve more tourist demand, but many others that never will, and will always need additional sources of revenue.

The concluding remark by the authors in the final chapter is that “Nature-based tourism should not be regarded as a substitute for other policy measures designed to sustain wild biodiversity, but it can be a useful supplement to such efforts.”

The chapters are as follows, and even a casual lance shows what a wide range of topics are addressed:

Part I: Background

1. An Overview of Nature-based Tourism and Conservation

2. The Growing Importance of Nature-based Tourism: Its Evolution and Significant Policy Issues

3. The User-Pays Principle and Conservation in National Parks: Review and Australian Case Study

Part II: Tourism, Protected Areas and Nature Conservation

4. World Heritage Listing of Australian Natural Sites: Effects on Tourism, Economic Value and Conservation

5. Antarctic Tourism: Environmental Concerns and the Importance of Antarctica’s Natural Attractions for Tourists

6. Rainforest Tourists: Wildlife and Other Features Attracting Visitors to Lamington National Park, Australia

7. Are Tourists Rational? Destination Decisions and Other Results from a Survey of Visitors to a North Queensland Natural Site – Jourama Falls

8. A Case Study of an NGO’s Ecotourism Efforts: Findings Based on a Survey of Visitors to its Tropical Nature Reserve

Part III: Particular Wildlife Species or Groups of Species as Tourist Attractions

9. Tourism as a Force for Conserving Sea Turtles Under Natural Conditions

10. The Role of Open-cycle Hatcheries Relying on Tourism in Sea Turtle Conservation: A Blessing or a Threat?

11. Whale-Watching as a Tourism Resource and as an Impetus for the Conservation of Whales

12. Little Penguins and Other Seabirds as Tourist Drawcards

13. Yellow-eyed Penguins and Royal Albatross as Valuable Tourist Attractions

14. Glow-worms and Other Insects Entice Tourists

15. Tree-Kangaroos, Tourism and Conservation: A Study of a Little-known Species

Part IV: This Study in Retrospect

16. General Conclusions

Where to purchase the book (or ask your library to do so)?

A couple of options are Google (a e-book option is by far the cheapest) and the Book Depository

 


Overview of Wildlife Tourism workshop, Darwin 2013

Overview of Wildlife Tourism workshop, Darwin 2013

Coming soon!

Wildlife Tourism workshop

Wildlife Tourism workshop

networking cruise with Sea Darwin

networking cruise with Sea Darwin

Injalak Hill, field trip to Arnhem Land

Injalak Hill, field trip to Arnhem Land

 

Waterbirds Kakadu

Waterbirds on post-workshop field trip to Kakadu


Events Calendar

We apologise that our events calendar is not live at the moment, however we are working on creating a new calendar that will be available shortly.

If you have any events, workshops, or special occasions you would like us to put on to our calendar, please email our webmaster.

webmaster@wildlifetourismaustralia.org.au

 


Wildlife Tourism AGM next month

 

Wildlife Tourism AGM next month

Wildlife Tourism Australia’s AGM will be held in late August 2013

Members who would like to stand for committee, please let us know ASAP. We have nominations already for chair, vice-chair, secretary and treasurer, which is great. Our constitution allows a further three members, so if you’d like the challenge and satisfaction of active involvement, contact Ronda Green by visiting the contact page http://wildlifetourism.org.au/contact/

Membership each year is from 1st July through to 30th June, so members should check whether they have renewed their memberships, and nonmembers might like to consider joining


Destiny Eco Cottage on TV

Destiny Eco Cottage to be on TV soon


 

Heike and Henry at Wildlife Expo

Destiny proprietor Heike with Henry at the Wildlife Expo in Beaudesert last year

15th of July, 5:30 pm on Channel 7

The Great South East 

The show will also be aired nationally on 7TWO on the Saturday after, 21st of July, 11:30am


Wildlife Tourism Australia  member Destiny Boonah ECO Cottages, the Wildlife Tour and their beautiful donkeys will be featured.


Training with Savannah Guides

 

Training with Savannah Guides

1-4 November 2012

Nitmiluk National Park, Northern Territory

The next Savannah Guides School will be held on the theme of “Working Together – Savannah Guides Partnerships” with a heavy involvement by NT Parks and Wildlife Service and Tourism NT, and association also with the Indigenous Business Partners and communities and organisations of the Katherine region.

Further information will soon be available on: http://sgltd.com.au/guide-schools/

 

 

 

 


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